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Choir and Handbells

"When Mass is being celebrated, the sanctuary is filled with countless angels who adore the divine victim immolated on the altar." Saint John Chrysostom

Saint Benedict Parish is blessed to have a full choir as well as a handbell choir that provide music to enrich the liturgy. The first tuned handbells were developed by brothers Robert and William Cor in Aldbourne, Wiltshire, England, between 1696 and 1724. The Cor brothers originally made latten bells for hame boxes, but for reasons unknown, they began tuning their bells more finely to have an accurate fundamental tone, and fitted them with hinged clappers that moved only in one plane. Handbells were first brought to the United States from England by Margaret Shurcliff in 1902. She was presented with a set of 10 handbells in London by Arthur Hughes, the general manager of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry.

Pipe Organ

Saint Benedict Church's Pipe Organ can be heard every Sunday, as well as during most holy days and special feasts. For a listing of our masses and liturgies, visit our mass times page. The origins of the pipe organ can be traced back to the hydraulis in Ancient Greece in the 3rd century BC, in which the wind supply was created with water pressure. By the 6th or 7th century AD, bellows were used to supply organs with wind. Beginning in the 12th century, the organ began to evolve into a complex instrument capable of producing different timbres. By the 17th century, most of the sounds available on the modern classical organ had been developed. From that time, the pipe organ was the most complex man-made device, a distinction it retained until it was displaced by the telephone exchange in the late 19th century.